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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 531 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 2:00am PST
alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between h
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
conservatives, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do
SFGTV2
Jan 1, 2013 2:30am PST
for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom. however, i would caution that it
CBS
Jan 1, 2013 5:00pm EST
level. and when you think about it, rudy, this is the one network where science is really taken seriously. >> oh, yeah. i mean, you know, pbs is such a gift. it's a gift for the whole family. i love the science shows. i love "nova." i've been on "nova" several times. i love "nova science now." so many great shows. i mean, i think, we mainly watch pbs at home. my little girl loves "thomas the tank engine." and you know, where else can you get that? i mean, it's just the best--by far, the best network. >> so actually, public broadcasting is good for you. >> it actually is good for you. i mean, you know, if you're watching a rerun of "gilligan's island," you're not doing much for your brain, but if you're learning new stuff and you're making new synapses, which you can only get at pbs, you're actually doing a lot of good for yourself. you're creating--helping create your super brain. >> and you know what, rudy, you actually, in the package clearly at the $144--i love the notion of a user's manual because it's this idea--we all take our brains for granted, but what you and dr. chopr
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00pm EST
had lured you into science. in science is deliberate parenting. nonstop hurricane. according to the book in her lap, the first two rules are number one, the truth at any price, including the price of your life and number two, look at things as though you've never seen him before. then proceed from there. look at things that everyone takes for granted and then see what you learn. so the next big question will be more important than the next answer. new questions can produce scientific links. insights that nine years later, a guy we'll call for a pure and i'm sure. it becomes your mission. finding the question that will produce the next big perception. an unfolding this point that will allow others to radically pursue how did god get into the picture? the bar mitzvah is coming up in your 12 years old. your dad is going through a party for all the kids that you know, all the kids who humiliate you three quarters of a mile from your home. this time you are invited. yes, you are invited and this is the first time you will attend a celebration with your peers. congratulations. it gets bet
SFGTV2
Dec 29, 2012 4:00pm PST
another meeting, from the breast cancer fund, we have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer,
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00pm EST
religion and politics with george will. next, a discussion on climate science, politics and global warming. panelists talked about what they think is next for the american west, texas, and north east due to climate change, and attitudes about science from the public. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you pu
SFGTV2
Dec 28, 2012 11:00am PST
- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california on a leave of absence from the science
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 11:30pm EST
copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> a discussion on climate science and politics. paul by director of nasa's goddard institute of space studies. another look at religion and politics. tomorrow, we are joined by the indiana rep. he will talk about the 113th congress in his priorities. join us sunday at 10:00 eastern and again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> as president obama begins his second term, what is the most important issue? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, make a video about your message to the president. is your chance to win $5,000. the deadline is january 18. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> next a discussion on climate science, politics, and global warming. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here. welcome. seven years ago, there was a consensus in washington that the earth's atmosphere could be altered. it is a different story. over the next hour, we will discuss opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:40am EST
you actually talk climate science 26 hours a day. but could you tell us a little bit of your conversations with sophie? thank you. >> yeah. so i don't think that it's appropriate to frighten children. [laughter]. and i -- so the only thing that -- until -- now, sophie is -- i have five grandchildren, sophie is the oldest, and finally, i am starting to explain the problem and the fact that there are solutions. but, other than that, i just -- the only thing that i've really done with grandchildren related to this is to try to help them understand nature. so for -- in particular, as i mentioned in my book, we have addressed the monarch butterfly problem. you know, a monarch butterfly as we've noticed on our farm, they are many fewer than they used to be, and that's mainly because not of global warming, but because of pesticides which have been used to reduce the number of milkweeds. and that -- so, therefore, with my grandchildren, we plant milkweeds. and then they learn about this remarkable life cycle of monarch butterflies which migrate all the way to mexico. well, i did -- i
SFGTV2
Jan 1, 2013 2:00am PST
science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be e
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:05pm EST
] >> we continue the discussion on climate science now with james hanson, head of the nasa institute for space studies and author of "storms of my grandchildren." he was awarded an award named for the scientist who advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and en
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 2:00pm EST
space program but in terms of science and everything else that goes along, it ended up being washed away in stimulus funds. as this hearing has highlighted, the approach to this lacks clear mission. he is relying on the success of commercial space. i strongly support a public /private partnership for our space policy. it is up to now said to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector does the not have enough funds to do it by itself. that rocket means a net to overcome the administration's shortsightedness. they supported a mission to the moon. president obama has taken a been there done that approach. we have not been there for 40 years. the partners would have helped us. they have never been there. this will fill the void be left behind. that will have a trickle down of that on the number of people that we train as scientists and engineers to keep america's pre- eminence in practically everything else. would you please discuss the problems caused by the cancellation of the program and what is needed from congress in this current fiscal environment to insure the succe
CBS
Jan 1, 2013 4:00pm EST
science is there to back it up. as a neuroscientist, i can tell you that. so let's start. first, i'm going to tell you the single most important thing you need to know about how to create your super brain. simply put, you need to realize that you are not your brain. that's right. you are not your brain. you are the user of your brain. your brain serves you. you shouldn't be serving it. and this will be a recurring theme throughout this presentation. for now, our task is to think about how to age and at the healthiest way, keep our brains healthy, and that means how can we develop a super brain? let me that begin by telling you a little bit about your own brain. what you may not know is that one of the reigning ideas about how the brain is organized is the triune brain, meaning that the brain has three major parts, okay? so to demonstrate this, i'm going to use my hand. this is called the handy brain and this was developed by ucla neuropsychiatrist dan siegel the handy version of the brain. so put up your hand. okay. now, fold your thumb inside and make a fist. so i want to show
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:35am EST
something to discredit me, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to b
SFGTV2
Dec 30, 2012 12:30pm PST
believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn, those ex
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 11:30am PST
science education and further society's understanding of the life sciences including the impact of gee ownmics on the practice of medicine. >> and by sam's club. committed to small business and the spirit of the entrepreneur. and proud to support pbs's to the contrary with bonnie erbe. additional funding provided by... this week on a special edition of to the contrary, we take an indepth look at dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare diseases. [♪] >> hello i'm bonnie erbe welcome to to the contrary a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. this week we show you how advances in dna sequencing are helping scientists find cures for rare diseases especially rare childhood diseases. dr. james lupski is a man with a mission as a pediatrician at baylor college of medicine in houston, dr. lupski has devoted much of his medical career to researching and treating children with rare diseases. >> the patients that i mainly see in the clinic are children and families in which a genetic disease will
NBC
Dec 24, 2012 2:50am EST
able to take advantage of the latest in skin care science. we don't want the cost to keep you from trying it and that's why we've created this special offer. we know that once you experience the miracle of great-looking skin, that you'll become a philosophy believer and we welcome you. >> female announcer: now's the time to call or go online because for a limited time, we're including free shipping. so don't wait, order your box of miracles by philosophy today and start looking as young as you feel. call or go online now. [♪...] call or go online now. [♪...] >> kimberley: welcome back to my quest to learn everything i can about the box of miracles by philosophy-- the brand that's acclaimed by doctors, celebrities and beauty experts like ross burton. he's the emmy-nominated makeup artist for the oprah winfrey show and one of philosophy's biggest fans. ...oh, lovely to meet you. >> welcome, welcome, so great to have you. >> so, ross, how awesome is it to have oprah as one of your clients? >> oh, kimberley, i mean, think of it. >> yes. >> it's a dream job. >> i'm curious to know:
ABC
Dec 31, 2012 6:30am EST
. commemorating the tribute to the orioles, sponsoring part of the display. >>> the science center celebrating the new year at the other 12:00. hosting the 5th annual midnight noon celebration. the ball drops at high noon, the party continues until 2:00 in the afternoon. midnight noon activities are free with a paid admission to the mailed science center. >>> hagerstown teenager who died this year in a single car crash will be honored as part of a float tomorrow. hoover died in march and the 17- year-old's family donated organs, the float will feature er a picture of hoover made out of plant materials. his parents will be going to california to decorate the float. his organs saved three lives. marylanders in summer set affected by sandy will be eligible to receive food stamps under an aid program announced sunday, president barack obama designated the county as a disaster area, eligible for assistance, providing one month of benefits to survivors. storm victims can apply from january 7th through the 13th at the department of social services and disaster recovery center in chrisfiel
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 9:30am PST
new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know
FOX Business
Dec 25, 2012 3:00pm EST
disclosure that if there is money to be made it by science. but we want to kill each other and my colleagues will run over their grandmother for the advancement. [laughter] >> absolutely. there is not very many rich scientist. you have your place in fame but it is the discovery. john: why don't people know about anarchy? >> it to tries to make itself look good. looking at the atomic bomb, experiments on prisoners of four it is in the name of science. the scientist for trusted they made sure they did not do anything to scare the public fish show thmselves as trustworthy. we will not blow up the world. john: even know about -- albert einstein. >> i thought he proved the theory of relativity. >> he was brilliant. >> = mcs glared? >> not qui einstein. he owned it and tried to prove it eight times and he even wrote that in the footnotes. let's go on anyway. his colleagues in new this. he covered every other thing in science but he left out the equals mc squared out. that shows you how he felt. >> i don't think we john: do you cheat? ever? never? you lied to be polite. maybe you take home the pens
SFGTV2
Dec 28, 2012 10:30pm PST
basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this w
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
these wonderful transforming experiences for readers. carson had only taken science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spring" is a disturbing book, a worrisome book to point that what we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. since it's not 1962 anymore, i thought i would explain more for you about who rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in the house in springfield, pennsylvania. when a person was born in the upstairs bedroom of the house, at the time did not have the addition on the brick inside. very simple, very modest house, four runs. two downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couple of couple of outhouses out that. a shed in the front of vacation i kept it worse and there was a little bit out of the west.??? there is enough property around the house that carson could explore the woods, often with her mother a
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 11:00am EST
language and technology intervention and art and science. which no other primate has done. there are simple examples of primates creating tools or using language but not in this indefinitely expanded hierarchical fashion that humans do. >> host: you are thinking of the main functions of the neocortex as high level functions such as decisionsmaking, inhibiting improper action, not so much -- see neocortex as a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high and low levels using the same algorithms. lot of pattern recognizers like the edges of objects or the capital wa and all these primitive functions. it is a high-level conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out as i was sending this to the publisher is what happens to the region of the neocortex ready optic words ago? it is very primitive pattern like the edges of objects. it is low level, very simple pattern. what happens to it? a blind person who is not getting any visual information, actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help process high-level language concepts. here is the s
KRON
Dec 25, 2012 11:00pm PST
sunny for the last day of 2012 and the last day on tuesday >>> we've seen break throughs in science and john has the top ten science stories at 2010 >> a revolutionary light called litro. >> this will change how we take and experience pictures. >> the camera captures the light field, allowing focus to be changed after it has been taken. no. 9, nasa space craft sent data about an asteroid. it appears vesta went through planet evolution and it's one of a kind. to be one of e only one that's left. >> no. 8, you may have heard the term god pardon cal. the european nuclear center claims to have found it. why is it a ci,]w:qbig deal? think big bang theory. >> in this particle, this set off the explosion that creates the universe. >> after analyzing data generated by an accelerator. >> at 7, a leap of faith. record breaking jump. bub broke the free fall record jumping from 128,000 feet in a space suit. >> i said the whole world is watching and i wish the world could see. cambodiag5a[([ and a package cac 71 was aggressive. he was there when the mystery was solved. >> those organizism and th
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:20pm EST
is driven by strong and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. people will be self interested. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is cap
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default. when you think of who the l
SFGTV
Dec 29, 2012 11:30am PST
museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other examples. along with that we will have a big conference with italian innovators and venture capitalists and along with large hi tech companies of silicon valley and come together and focus on specific projects how to work together for technological innovation. it will be focused on silicon valley but also the cultural institute in san francisco we have surprises for you that we're preparing. any other questions? >> [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] the problem of the public -- i would like for you to answer it -- [inaudible] >> i try not to be technical, but i hope i would be pervasive just telling you the debt crisis is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long time, but the point is it's very manageable. we are
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 10:00pm EST
lecture by tied a can and a member of the house committee on science and technology is the guy than there was a theory that on me just was not a good candidate and did not connect very well and was somewhat awkward. remember when he went to michigan and said trees were the right to heighth. the actual quote was a love this state. it seems right that the trees are the right height. [laughter] away from here i find no trees in that please. no trees as such a perfect height as these. can never be at ease with trees that grow higher than one's knees or too high to splinter in the breeze. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i tried to help them out when they we
FOX Business
Dec 24, 2012 10:00pm EST
less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk talk" is coming up so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negotiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thought i would show you what thuld happen if we change into the speaker boehner plan, the president obama plan, let's start out with the do-nothing plan because that's the plan we0 have right now. the cbo estimates fiscal year 2013 deficit will be, well,lionf $104 trillion for fiscal year al 2013.well, it's so we get up to 2014, it is going to be about $19.4 billion -- exc
CBS
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
rare glimpse inside the science behind the field sobriety tests. what officers look for and how it all works. >> now we look at the science in action as the officers and our cameras leave the lab and hit the roads. delia goncalves has the exclusive ridealong with park police and this was really interesting. >> reporter: you know, when i spoke to park police during the day, they said these are the signs and this is what we see. we literally saw it all on the roads when we were out with them. this is the holiday season and so certainly very busy for them. unfortunately, when you take a look at this video, it is rare but it does show us just how widespread the problem of drinking and driving is on our local roads. ♪ we first met park police sergeant during the day. >> it's like i say to everybody it's a front row seat to the greatest show on earth. >> reporter: he said his best work at night. so he invited us out friday night to bw parkway. >> we're stopping people that have alcohol levels that are on average a .16 which is double the legal limit. >> reporter: the shift starts off s
SFGTV2
Dec 24, 2012 9:00pm PST
writing in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chr
CNBC
Dec 23, 2012 7:30pm EST
terms of charter schools, in terms of focusing on stem -- science technology, engineering and math. things that will transform american education, which will transform the american economy. >> that's a good point. and right now, across the country, you're seeing certain areas become rewired for what you're talking about, technology and science. gentlemen, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> great to have you on the program. charles bronfman and jeffrey solomon. >>> up next on "the wall street journal report", what will have an impact on your money. and what a tree and ice have in common. stay with us. tburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> we have some big news to tell you about. beginning in january, we will have a new name. look for "on the money" with maria bartiromo. we'll have some exciting new segments for you, great guests and, of course, i'll
PBS
Dec 31, 2012 7:00pm PST
the elderly. it sound like science-fiction but increasingly science fact and with good reason. japanese society is ageing faster than any in the world. over 3 million people suffer from senile dementia. nursing staff and facilities are stretched past capacity. against this backdrop researchers are building new and intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this old people's home in yokohama city, south of tokyo. the residents move their bodies on cue from a robot. the exercise helps the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they are recognized as medical equipment. ironically, care-giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only
KCSMMHZ
Dec 31, 2012 6:00am PST
of protests. >>> japanese robots that look after the elderly, it sounds like science fiction but it's increasingly science fact and with good reason. japanese society is aging faster than any in the world. nursing facilities are stretched past capacity. against this backdrop, researchers are building new and humane intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this hold people's home south of tokyo. ♪ >> reporter: the residents move their bodies on cue from a robot. the exercise helps the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they recognize the medical equipment. ironically, care giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only by hum
CBS
Dec 31, 2012 12:00pm EST
cost up to $10 million. it will be built on state-owned land behind the science museum of virginia. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is being treated in the hospital for a blood clot. her doctors said yesterday that the clot stems from the concussion that she sustained several weeks ago. mrs. clinton is being held at the new york presbyterian hospital. >>> venezuelan president hugo chavez has suffered new complications while undergoing cancer treatment. chavez had surgery in cuba after the cancer returned 18 months ago. but three weeks ago chavez developed a respiratory infection. the vice president left venezuela to visit chavez, and it is a sign things could be going downhill. >>> nine people are dead after a charter bus carrying 40 people ripped through a guardrail and fell several hundred feet down the snowy slope. this happened yesterday morning in eastern oregon. officials say rescue workers were using ropes to help retrieve people from the scene. the bus was on its way to vancouver from las vegas. >>> the father of the gunman who opened fire in the connecticut school h
FOX
Dec 24, 2012 6:00pm PST
watching a levy on the peninsula after one day of flooding. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler live now with the beginnings of a levy repair. john? >> reporter: state crews have moved us back from the levy here anticipating that trucks will arrive here momentarily to begin sand bagging. this video now. you can see the creek is much comer than last -- calmer than last might. they worked fast to get this temporary fix underway. >> reporter: not fast enough for residents who lived through repeated flooding here. >> i am worried because it is supposed to rain tomorrow. >> reporter: homeowners cleared mud and debris from the flood. >> like a big lake. lot of trees going down. garbage. >> reporter: the creek topped the levy. 7 homes damaged. several hundred people evacuated. >> having a levy failure here would be catastrophic. >> reporter: as you see that failure began last night. our cameras caught water bubbling through. today officials took an emergency survey. last night's creek flow was the third highest since the levy was built 82 years ago. >> not certified. not in good
FOX
Jan 1, 2013 5:30am EST
now--- science is backkng thaa up.the american academy of pediatrics says recess is day and stresses it should ol - punishment. the time is esseettal for kids echarging their rains.and because kids lives are áso ssrrctured poday... unstructured ...ásupervisedá play is important for creativity and poeeall wel being. it was a year of zany antics on sports fields across the glo. globe.we take a look at some of 2012's most mmeorable sports bloopers. blooperr. iffyoo're nursing a hangover wassing yyur time.we're o help 3 separating hangover cure fact from fiitiin. dehydration and is often y behind the morning- after peeling. one of the best things you can do to cure a hangover is to drink plenty of . water.myth # 2. take pain hangover and can havv a tion. dangerous interrction with the alcohol in your system. system..yyh # 3. eat while foods work best.. food slows 3 pest.myth # 4. drink cafffine: fiction. it will wake yoo up any quicker. quicker.mytt # 5. sleep it off: fact. ttme nd rest are some of the best hangover currs. the nee year iss here... anndnow... it's timm to put all that
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 1:00am PST
neither is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week a
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